INDUCTEES

Click on photo to view more information on each hall of fame inductee.

2015 US Army Women Foundation Hall of Fame Inductee Col Jill Chambers

COL Jill Chambers

USA (Ret.)

COLONEL JILL W. CHAMBERS, USA (Ret) is widely recognized as the first person in the history of the U.S. Military to develop a successful, sustainable strategy to reduce the crippling stigma associated with mental health challenges in a warrior culture. Retiring in 2009 after 28 years of active duty, Colonel Chambers is currently the Founder of This Able Vet, LLC, an organization that continues her commitment to real time solutions and non pharmaceutical alternatives for Post-Traumatic Stress amongst veterans. In 2007, Col. Chambers was selected to serve as Special Assistant to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to conduct a focused study in the areas of PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury and spent 18 months traveling the U.S, witnessing firsthand the often heart-breaking difficulties returning warriors face. Jill’s daughter Captain Gwynn Miller is also in the military.

COL Jill Chambers
USA (Ret.)

2015 US Army Womens Foundation Hall of Fame Inductee Mary Sutherland was awarded posthumously

CSM Mary Sutherland

USA (Ret.) - (Posthumously)

COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR MARY E. SUTHERLAND, USA (Ret) entered the Women’s Army Corps in June 1969. Her tours of duty included Germany, Bosnia, Honduras, and Italy. At the time of her retirement, CSM Sutherland was the Senior Enlisted person in the United States Army. She was the only woman of any rank in the U.S. Army to have been active duty for 35 years, earning her a place in Army history.

CSM Mary Sutherland
USA (Ret.) - (Posthumously)

The Army Distinguished Flying Cross Recipients

2015 US Army Womens Foundation Inductee for the Army Distinguised Flying Cross Recipient

1LT Aleda E. Lutz

USA

The Distinguished Flying Cross, created by Congress 80 years ago, is America’s oldest military aviation award. The Distinguished Flying Cross was designed by Elizabeth Will and Arthur E. Dubois both working at the Army’s Institute of Heraldry. The cross symbolizes sacrifice, and the propeller symbolizes flight. The combination of those symbols makes clear that the DFC is an award for heroism or achievement for individuals involved in aviation. The ribbon reflects the national colors. The reverse is blank and suitable for engraving the recipient’s name and rank. Subsequent awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross are indicated by oak-leaf clusters for Army and Air Force personnel and by additional award stars for members of the Naval services. In World War I, aircraft proved their value for reconnaissance and as weapons platforms. Pilots of those primitive flying machines showed both courage and endurance in carrying out air missions. To recognize their gallantry, the Distinguished Flying Cross was created. US Army Women Foundation Hall of Fame award was Accepted by: STAFF SERGEANT JULIA A. STALKER, USA is a Distinguished Flying Cross recipient.

``Lutz was the first army nurse to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross (posthumously, from President Franklin D. Roosevelt), Lutz was the second woman to receive the decoration (after Amelia Earhart), awarded for distinguished performance in an aerial flight. It reads as follows: For extraordinary achievement—throughout her long period of service, 1st Lt. Lutz distinguished herself through superior professional skill and courage. Her selfless devotion to duty and outstanding proficiency have reflected the highest credit upon herself and the armed forces of the United States. Her resourcefulness and determination have been on high inspiration those serving with her.``

1LT Aleda E. Lutz
USA

2015 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Distinguished Flying Cross Recipient 1LT Roberta Schilbach Ross

1LT Roberta Schilbach Ross

USA

The Distinguished Flying Cross, created by Congress 80 years ago, is America’s oldest military aviation award. The Distinguished Flying Cross was designed by Elizabeth Will and Arthur E. Dubois both working at the Army’s Institute of Heraldry.The cross symbolizes sacrifice, and the propeller symbolizes flight. The combination of those symbols makes clear that the DFC is an award for heroism or achievement for individuals involved in aviation. The ribbon reflects the national colors. The reverse is blank and suitable for engraving the recipient’s name and rank. Subsequent awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross are indicated by oak-leaf clusters for Army and Air Force personnel and by additional award stars for members of the Naval services. In World War I, aircraft proved their value for reconnaissance and as weapons platforms. Pilots of those primitive flying machines showed both courage and endurance in carrying out air missions. To recognize their gallantry, the Distinguished Flying Cross was created. US Army Women Foundation Hall of Fame award was Accepted by: STAFF SERGEANT JULIA A. STALKER, USA is a Distinguished Flying Cross recipient.

1LT Roberta Schilbach Ross
USA

2015 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Distinguished Flying Cross Recipient Inductee CW3 Lori Hill standing in front of her helicopter

CW3 Lori Hill

USA

The Distinguished Flying Cross, created by Congress 80 years ago, is America's oldest military aviation award. The Distinguished Flying Cross was designed by Elizabeth Will and Arthur E. Dubois both working at the Army's Institute of Heraldry. The cross symbolizes sacrifice, and the propeller represents flight. The combination of those symbols clarifies that the DFC is an award for heroism or achievement for individuals involved in aviation. The ribbon reflects the national colors. The reverse is blank and suitable for engraving the recipient's name and rank. Subsequent awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross are indicated by oak-leaf clusters for Army and Air Force personnel and additional award stars for members of the Naval services. In World War I, aircraft proved their value for reconnaissance and as weapons platforms. Pilots of those primitive flying machines showed both courage and endurance in carrying out air missions. To recognize their gallantry, the Distinguished Flying Cross was created. U.S. Army Women Foundation Hall of Fame award was Accepted by STAFF SERGEANT JULIA A. STALKER, USA, who is also a Distinguished Flying Cross recipient.

``Chief Warrant Officer 3 (CWO-3) Lori Hill, United States Army, was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight while serving as Pilot of a Kiowa helicopter of the 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, in Support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 21 March 2006 in Iraq. Chief Warrant Officer Three Hill and another helicopter were flying convoy security for two Bradley vehicles on patrol in a small village. They learned of an attack at a nearby command center involving both U.S. and Iraqi forces, so they responded to provide air support. On the way, they ran into a concentrated attack with rocket-propelled grenades and machine gunfire. They laid down suppressing fire, but the two aircraft continued. When they arrived at the command center, they were greeted with machine-gun fire, so they broke away and headed back in, shooting at the tracer fire. Drawing the fire away from the lead helo, Chief Warrant Officer Three Hill established communications with the ground troops. It provided suppressive fire for troops engaged with the enemy on the ground until they reached safety. On the third pass, a rocket-propelled grenade hit her, damaging the helo's instrumentation. As she was banking away, the helicopter took machine-gun fire, which hit Chief Warrant Officer Three Hill in the foot. The aircraft was losing transmission power and hydraulics, which prevented the copter from hovering, a crucial maneuver for landing. So, with a damaged aircraft and injury, she made an emergency landing at a nearby forward operating base, saving her crew and aircraft.`` (Retrieved from https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/393194)

CW3 Lori Hill
USA

2015 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Distinguished Flying Cross recipient Inductee SSG Julia Stalker accepting the award for all recipients.

SSG Julia Stalker

USA

Army Women Distinguished Flying Cross Recipients. The Distinguished Flying Cross, created by Congress 80 years ago, is America’s oldest military aviation award.
Elizabeth Will and Arthur E. Dubois designed the Distinguished Flying Cross, both working at the Army’s Institute of Heraldry. The cross symbolizes sacrifice, and the propeller represents flight. The combination of those symbols clarifies that the DFC is an award for heroism or achievement for individuals involved in aviation. The ribbon reflects the national colors. The reverse is blank and suitable for engraving the recipient’s name and rank. Subsequent awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross are indicated by oak-leaf clusters for Army and Air Force personnel and additional award stars for members of the Naval services. In World War I, aircraft proved their value for reconnaissance and as weapons platforms. Pilots of those primitive flying machines showed both courage and endurance in carrying out air missions. To recognize their gallantry, the Distinguished Flying Cross was created.

• 1st Lieutenant Aleda E. Lutz, USA
• 1st Lieutenant Roberta Schilbach Ross, USA
• Chief Warrant Officer 3 Lori Hill, USA
• Staff Sergeant Julia Stalker, USA

The awards were accepted by STAFF SERGEANT JULIA A. STALKER, USA is a Distinguished Flying Cross recipient. She served as a combat medic and deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. SSG Stalker also deployed to Afghanistan twice with the 10th Combat Aviation Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Currently, SSG Stalker is serving as an instructor/ writer at the U.S. Army School of Aviation Medicine in Fort Rucker, Alabama.

SSG Julia Stalker
USA

Female Firsts Award

2015 US Army Women Foundation inductee Col Sally D Murphy

COL Sally Murphy

USA (Ret.)

COLONEL SALLY D. MURPHY, USA (Ret) earned the distinction of becoming an U.S. Army aviator and first woman U.S. Army helicopter pilot. Col. Murphy began her aviation training flying helicopters at Fort Rucker, Alabama, in September 1973. At the time the Army was increasing roles and numbers of women in nearly every endeavor. Helicopters are the backbone of Army air support to ground warfare, along with other smaller, specialized activities including fixed wing aircraft. The Army’s initial plan blended her intelligence background with aviation and used her as a member of a small unit supporting early warning and signal intelligence in Germany. She served almost 27 years in the U.S. Army.

COL Sally Murphy
USA (Ret.)