INDUCTEES

Click on photo to view more information on each hall of fame inductee.

2014 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Inductee the 14 WAC All Female Band

The 14th WAC Band: America's Last All-Female Military Band

14TH ARMY BAND (WOMEN'S ARMY CORPS) was America’s last all-female military band. The other military branches fielded all-female bands, but the WAC Band survived longer than any other. Over four decades (1948 to 1976), the WAC Band offered a woman the rare chance to have a career as a professional musician. The standards were very high for WAC Band members. They were not only elite musicians, they were representatives of the United States Army. Their audiences were diverse — they marched out recruits for morning drills; they performed for enthusiastic audiences in small town America; and they played for presidents.

U.S. ARMY CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 5 JEANNEY accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the 14th Army Band (Women's Army Corps). CW5 Pace currently serves as the commander and band master of the 1st Cavalry Division Band. CW5 Pace is the longest serving female in the Army. She is the only woman from the Women’s Army Corps Band and Women's Army Corps left on active duty.

The 14th WAC Band: America's Last All-Female Military Band

The Silver Star Recipients

2014 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Silver Recipients pictured Left to right 1LT Mary Roberts, 2LT Elaine Roe, and 2LT Rita Rourke receiving there awards

1LT Mary Roberts

USA

The Silver Star, officially referred to as the Silver Star Medal by all of the United States Armed Forces, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY, KENNETH O. PRESTON, accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the Female Silver Star Recipient.

The citation for 1LT Mary Roberts General Orders for the Silver Star for her actions during World War II read as followed:

``The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Mary L. Roberts, United States Army Nurse Corps, for gallantry in action, February 1945. On that date the 56th Evacuation Hospital was heavily shelled by enemy artillery while Lieutenant Roberts was on duty as Operating Room Chief Nurse. The operating room tent in which she was working was hit. The team and its equipment were damaged and two enlisted men were wounded by shell fragments from air bursts which continued for approximately thirty minutes. Lieutenant Roberts exhibited exceptional coolness and outstanding leadership, reassured the nurses under her charge and encouraged and urged them to greater efforts. Despite the impairment of facilities and the prolonged shelling, the vital work of three operating tables was continued under the inspiration of her conduct and example. The actions of Lieutenant Roberts, in a critical situation, ensured the uninterrupted continuation of activities and contributed in a large measure to the success of the operations. Her bravery and unfaltering devotion to duty and complete disregard for her own welfare are in the best traditions of the military service and reflect the highest credit on herself and the Army Nurse Corps (retrieved from https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/111307).``

1LT Mary Roberts
USA

2014 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Inductee Silver Star Recipient Elaine A. Roe

2LT Elaine Roe

USA

The Silver Star, officially referred to as the Silver Star Medal by all of the United States Armed Forces, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY, KENNETH O. PRESTON, accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the Female Silver Star Recipients.

The citation for 2LT Elaine A. Roe General Orders for the Silver Star for her actions during World War II read as followed:

``The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Elaine A. Roe, United States Army Nurse Corps, for gallantry in action on 10 February 1944, near Anzio, Italy. During a concentrated shelling of the 33d Field Hospital by heavy caliber enemy artillery the entire hospital area was sprayed with shell fragments which killed two nurses and wounded other military personnel. Electric wires were cut and lights extinguished. Working with flashlights, Lieutenant Elaine Roe and Lieutenant Rita Rourke immediately began the orderly evacuation of forty-two patients while quieting others who had become alarmed and were attempting to leave their beds. Throughout the shelling, which included enemy air bursts, they exhibited remarkable coolness and courage and carried on with complete disregard for their own safety. The quick thinking, competence under unnerving conditions and the loyal consideration of Lieutenant Roe and Lieutenant Rourke for the welfare of their patients, prevented confusion which might have been critical, and were an inspiration to the enlisted men working under their supervision. Their actions reflected the finest traditions of the United States Army and the Army Nurse Corps.``

2LT Elaine Roe
USA

2014 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Silver Recipients pictured Left to right 1LT Mary Roberts, 2LT Elaine Roe, and 2LT Rita Rourke receiving there awards

2LT Rita Virginia Rourke

USA

The Silver Star, officially referred to as the Silver Star Medal by all of the United States Armed Forces, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY, KENNETH O. PRESTON, accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the Female Silver Star Recipient.

The citation for 2LT Rita Virginia Rourke General Orders for the Silver Star for her actions during World War II read as followed:

``The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Rita Virginia Rourke (ASN: N-731874), United States Army Nurse Corps, for gallantry in action on 10 February 1944, near Anzio, Italy. During a concentrated shelling of the 33d Field Hospital by heavy caliber enemy artillery the entire hospital area was sprayed with shell fragments which killed two nurses and wounded other military personnel. Electric wires were cut and lights extinguished. Working with flashlights, Lieutenant Elaine Roe and Lieutenant Rita Rourke immediately began the orderly evacuation of forty-two patients while quieting others who had become alarmed and were attempting to leave their beds. Throughout the shelling, which included enemy air bursts, they exhibited remarkable coolness and courage and carried on with complete disregard for their own safety. The quick thinking, competence under unnerving conditions and the loyal consideration of Lieutenant Roe and Lieutenant Rourke for the welfare of their patients, prevented confusion which might have been critical, and were an inspiration to the enlisted men working under their supervision. Their actions reflected the finest traditions of the United States Army and the Army Nurse Corps.``

2LT Rita Virginia Rourke
USA

2014 US Army's Women Foundation Hall of Fame Silver Star Recipient Inductee 2LT Ellen Ainsworth

2LT Ellen Ainsworth

USA (Posthumously)

The Silver Star, officially referred to as the Silver Star Medal by all of the United States Armed Forces, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY, KENNETH O. PRESTON, accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the Female Silver Star Recipients.

The citation for 2LT Ellen G. Ainsworth General Orders for the Silver Star for her actions during World War II read as followed:

``2LT Ellen G. Ainsworth (ASN: N-732770), United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star (Posthumously) for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 56th Evacuation Hospital, in action at Anzio, Italy, on 10 February 1944. Second Lieutenant Ainsworth's gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for her own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon herself, her unit, and the United States Army.``

2LT Ellen Ainsworth
USA (Posthumously)

2014 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Silver Star Inductee SGT Leigh Ann Hester

SGT Leigh Ann Hester

USA

The Silver Star, officially referred to as the Silver Star Medal by all of the United States Armed Forces, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY, KENNETH O. PRESTON, accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the Female Silver Star Recipients.

The citation for SGT Leigh Ann Hester General Orders for the Silver Star for her actions during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM read as followed:

``The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Leigh Ann Hester, United States Army, for exceptionally valorous achievement during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 20 March 2005, in Iraq. Sergeant Hester's heroic actions in Iraq contributed to the overwhelming success of the Multi-National Corps-Iraq mission. While serving as the Team Leader for RAVEN 42B in the 617th Military Police Company, 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne), 18th Military Police Brigade, Sergeant Hester led her soldiers on a counterattack of anti-Iraqi Forces (AIF) who were ambushing a convoy with heavy AK-47 assault rifle fire, PRK machine gun fire, and rocket propelled grenades. Sergeant Hester maneuvered her team through the kill zone into a flanking position where she assaulted a trench line with grenades and M-203 rounds. She then cleared two trenches with her Squad Leader where she engaged and eliminated 3 AIF with her M-4 rifle. Her actions saved the lives of numerous convoy members. Sergeant Hester's bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflects distinct credit upon herself, the 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne), the 18th Military Police Brigade, and the United States Army. ``

``NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: Sergeant Leigh A. Hester is cited for conspicuous gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with anti Iraq forces (AIF) as a team leader for Raven 42B, 617th Military Police Company, 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne) stationed at Camp Liberty, Iraq on 20 March 2005, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. The team's mission was to assist Raven 42 in searching the Eastern Convoy Route for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and provide additional security to sustainment convoys traveling through their area of responsibility. While patrolling Alternate Supply Route (ASR) Detroit, Raven 42B was shadowing a sustainment convoy consisting of 30 third country national (TCN) semi-tractor trailers with a three vehicle squad size escort, call sign Stallion 33, traveling from LSA (logistics support area) Anaconda to CSC (convoy support center) Scania. The weather for this ASR patrol was 75 degrees and sunny with a 10 knot breeze from the southwest. While traveling on ASR Detroit approximately 50 AIF ambushed the convoy with heavy AK47 fire, RPK heavy machine gun fire, and rocket propelled grenades (RPGs) from the southwest side of the road at 1140 hours. The AIF were utilizing irrigation ditches and an orchard for the well planned complex attack. The AIF had cars combat parked along a road perpendicular to the ASR with all doors and trunks open. The AIF intent was to destroy the convoy, to inflict numerous casualties, and to kidnap several TCN drivers or U.S. Soldiers. The initial ambush disabled and set on fire the lead TCN vehicle, which effectively blocked the southbound lanes of ASR Detroit, stopping the convoy in the kill zone. The squad leader, Staff Sergeant Timothy Nein, directed the squad to move forward, traveling on the right shoulder and passing through the engagement area between the enemy and the convoy. Sergeant Hester directed her gunner to provide heavy volumes of MK 19 and M240B fires into the field where an overwhelming number of insurgents were executing a well coordinated ambush on the convoy. Raven 42 elements were outnumbered five to one. Staff Sergeant Nein ordered the squad to flank the insurgents on their right side. The squad continued to come under heavy machine gun fire and rocket propelled grenade fire when Sergeant Hester stopped her vehicle, the middle vehicle, at a flanking position enfilading the trench line and the orchard field where over a dozen insurgents were engaging the squad and convoy. She then directed her gunner to focus fires in the trench line and the orchard field. Sergeant Hester dismounted and moved to what was thought to be the non-contact side of the vehicle. She ordered her gunner to continue to fire on the orchard field as she and her driver engaged insurgents in the orchard field with small arms. Sergeant Hester began engaging the insurgents with her M203 in order to suppress the heavy AIF fire. Sergeant Hester followed Staff Sergeant Nein to the right side berm and threw two well placed fragmentation grenades into the trench eliminating the AIF threat. Sergeant Hester and Staff Sergeant Nein went over the berm into the trench and began clearing the trench with their M4s. Sergeant Hester engaged and eliminated three AIF to her front with her M4. They then made their way to the front trench and cleared that as well. After clearing the front trench cease fire was called and she began securing the ambush site. The final result of the ambush was 27 AIF KIA (killed in action), 6 AIF WIA (wounded in action), and one AIF captured.``

SGT Leigh Ann Hester
USA

2014 US Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame Silver Star Inductee SGT Monica L. Brown

SGT Monica L. Brown

USA

The Silver Star, officially referred to as the Silver Star Medal by all of the United States Armed Forces, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY, KENNETH O. PRESTON, accepted the Hall of Fame Induction Award on behalf of the Female Silver Star Recipients.

The citation for SGT Monica L. Brown General Orders for the Silver Star for her actions during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM read as followed:

``The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist `{`the Private First Class`}` Monica Lin Brown, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving with as a Combat Medic with the 4th Squadron, 73d Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82d Airborne Division, in action on 25 April 2007, during an enemy ambush in Jani Khel, Afghanistan, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. Specialist Brown displayed great courage in treating two wounded Soldiers while under intense small arms and mortar fire. Specialist Brown's heroic actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service, reflecting great credit upon herself, the 82d Airborne Division, and the United States Army. NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: Private First Class Monica Lin Brown, United States Army, distinguished herself by extraordinary heroism in action on 25 April 2007. On that date, 2d Platoon, Charlie Troop, 4th Squadron, 73d Cavalry Regiment, was on a combat patrol moving to Jani Khel, Afghanistan, for a leader engagement with the village elders. The element consisted of five vehicles: four M1151 Uparmored HMMWV's (UAH) and one Afghan National Army (ANA) Ford Ranger. They were in a column formation moving north along Route VIPER. In the vicinity of 42S VA263021 the trail vehicle, C23, struck a pressure plate IED on the driver's side rear tire, which ignited the fuel tank and fuel cans mounted on the rear of the vehicle. The explosion of the fuel tank and cans engulfed the vehicle in an intense fireball. This initiated a planned ambush which commenced after the explosion. The patrol began to take small arms fire from the direction of a kholat to the east, approximately 100 meters away. The small arms fire was impacting around the lead vehicle which was 300 meters north of the IED site. The small arms fire began to concentrate on the IED site as the Platoon Medic, Private First Class Brown, moved on foot to evaluate the casualties. She was exposed to the small arms fire until the maneuver element could swing around and begin suppressing the enemy as she treated the wounded Soldiers. After making an initial assessment and treating in order of severity, she moved the casualties with the aid and direction of the Platoon Sergeant, into the wadi the engulfed vehicle was hanging over. The enemy fighters then engaged the patrol with mortar fire. Private First Class Brown threw her own body over the casualties to shield them as the mortars were impacting 75 to 100 meters away. Approximately 15 mortars impacted within close range of the casualties as Private First Class Brown continued treatment. Private First Class Brown continued treatment in the wadi approximately 15 meters from the burning vehicle, at which time the onboard 60-mm. mortar, 5.56-mm. ammunition, and 40-mm. grenade rounds on board began to explode. Again disregarding her own safety, Private First Class Brown shielded the casualties with her own body as large chunks of shrapnel and 5.56-mm. rounds began flying through the air from the burning vehicle. The patrol leader arrived on site and found it incredible she was still alive and treating the casualties amidst the extremely dangerous conditions she was operating under. Given the hazards to Private First Class Brown, the platoon sergeant used the ANA Ranger to move the wounded Soldiers and Private First Class Brown to a more protected position. As the truck began driving down the wadi, a large 60-mm. mortar explosion occurred sending shrapnel flying all around where Private First Class Brown had been treating casualties. The platoon leader was dragged by the ANA truck with the casualties as the explosions became incredibly intense and the platoon sergeant moved Private First Class Brown to a more protected position to continue treatment. Private First Class Brown continued treatment of the two wounded Soldiers at the new site as enemy small arms fire began to impact around the new position. Private First Class Brown continued treatment of the casualties as the platoon returned fire in close vicinity of her. She shielded the wounded from falling brass and enemy fire once again, ensuring the casualties were stabilized and ready for MEDEVAC.``

SGT Monica L. Brown
USA

Female Firsts Award

CSM Michelle Jones 2014 US Army Womens Foundation Hall of Fame Inductee Female First Award

CSM Michele Jones

USA (Ret.) Office of the Chief, U.S. Army Reserve

COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR MICHELE S. JONES, USAR (Ret) is the Director of External Veterans/Military Affairs and Community Outreach for the Office of the U.S. President Barak Obama. CSM Jones was the first woman in the United States Army Reserve to reach the position of command sergeant major. She was the first female non-commissioned officer to serve in the highest enlisted position of a component of the U.S. Army, active or reserve, and was at one time the highest-ranking African-American female enlisted person in any branch of the United States military, as well as the highest-ranking enlisted African American in the Army Reserve.

CSM Michele Jones
USA (Ret.) Office of the Chief, U.S. Army Reserve